Category Archives: Maintenance Management

Defective winch brake on tug

Outline: A captain reports a disconcerting discovery while approaching the berth. What the reporter told us: My vessel was arriving at a regularly visited port at which we take a pilot and two tugs for manoeuvring when berthing in a cargo basin with a narrow entrance channel. My ship was proceeding at less than 2kts […]

Pilots corner – a lucky escape, consequences, and design issues

Three reports illustrating different aspects of an ongoing problem. Outline (1): A report received detailing a lucky escape What the reporter told us: While boarding the vessel at the pilot exchange station, one of the side ropes snapped. No other pilot ladders were available. Further dialogue: Luckily, the pilot had only climbed two steps when […]

Correspondence Received – Incorrect windlass brake band adjustment

On many vessels I have sailed on we have the same situation – the bosun tightens the bolts and chief officers and masters do not pay any attention to this problem. But the consequences of this wrong adjustment are slow speed of winch, damage to the brake liner, slackening of ropes and anchor and possibly […]

Correspondence received – Overweight rescue boats

Several years ago, I was reading an article about a rescue boat that parted the fall wire and fell into the dock during a practice drill because it was overweight due to water entering the buoyancy spaces – one person was killed and two others badly injured. The next day I checked our own rescue […]

ECDIS /AIS position data affecting a Portable Pilot Unit (PPU)

Outline: Defects, errors and anomalies with equipment do occur, but once they are identified they need to be addressed and resolved in a timely fashion. What the reporter told us: The vessel’s ECDIS displayed an incorrect position – the vessel was displayed halfway over the wharf when alongside. In addition, the vessel’s AIS had significantly […]

Working Aloft

Outline: Nobody ever deliberately sets out to have an accident or to injure themselves, but some people appear to try very hard. What the reporter told us: Whilst our vessel was alongside, I observed the following on an adjacent vessel. A crew member (or possibly a contractor) was standing on the outside of the back […]

Inflatable lifejacket – service tag fitted incorrectly

Outline: The following report was received from a company DPA. What the reporter told us: I want to share the following with you as I feel it would make a worthwhile safety flash to share across the industry. One of our vessels has reported that on two of its inflatable lifejackets, the servicing tags had […]

More main engine problems whilst arriving and sailing

Outline: Although this topic was extensively covered in a recent issue of Maritime FEEDBACK, (MFB55), these two reports serve as a timely reminder to always be prepared for the unexpected. What the reporter told us (1): The vessel in question recently suffered a main engine problem shortly after departing her berth. It was found that […]

Correspondence Received – Minimum speed for going astern

With respect to your article in MFB56 regarding the master pilot exchange, it mentions that the main engine failed to start astern because the vessel was travelling at 3.5 knots. When the vessel reduced to 3 knots then there was no problem in getting the engine to go astern. Is the 3 knots figure an […]

Learning opportunities from non-compliance reports

Outline: Two reports were received recently that contained references to unusual recommendations, rules and regulations. Following the adage ‘take every opportunity to learn’, CHIRP is  publishing  details in the belief that they need to be promulgated more widely to prevent ships’ crews falling foul of them.  Remember that other legal truism ‘ignorance of the law […]